Essay On The Samurais Garden

Gail Tsukiyama’s The Samurai’s Garden Essay

Gail Tsukiyama’s The Samurai's Garden

Gail Tsukiyama’s The Samurai’s Garden is set in 1930s Japan, the theme of war and peace is developed through Character interaction. Characters in the story have very different reactions to the same circumstances. Through the character of Stephen, one can conclude that outside forces do not control a person’s life because in life, people can take what has been given to them and do with it what they wish. In other words, life is what you make of it. Even though the war in China is very important to Stephen, he does not let it interfere with his descisions in Tarumi.

     Despite his situation, Stephen is able to separate the good from the bad and his experiences benefit him greatly. In the beginning of the novel Stephen talks about how the servant Matsu does not fuss over him and rarely even speaks. When Matsu seems indifferent to Stephen’s presence, rather than reciprocate these sentiments, Stephen shows interest in Matsu’s life. Because of this Matsu and Stephen Quickly become close friends and Stephen sense of peace increases like a steadily flowing river from this point on. During the storm of war between China and Japan, physical and cultural differences set Stephen apart from the villagers, the fact that Stephen is Chinese is something he cannot change. Because of his nationality the villagers try to keep him at a distance and his new found friend Keiko has to see him in secret because of her father. The more Stephen and Keiko meet, the closer they become, and the more Stephen’s sense of peace grows. Being Chinese and living in Japan could have proved to be a problem. As Stephen learns more about Matsu, the Japanese push closer to Hong Kong, but Stephen’s optimism about his circumstances makes his experience a pleasant one.

     Later on in the story, Matsu decides to take Stephen up to Yamaguchi, the village of the lepers. Stephen is at first nervous about this trip, but loosens when he meets Sachi. Sachi was the...

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The Samurai's Garden by Gail Tsukiyama is a book about a young man, Stephen, who is faced with tuberculosis changing the course of his life by taking him to a small peaceful village, Tarumi. When he first arrives at Tarumi, he meets Matsu, Sachi, and other characters from the village. His experiences at Tarumi are one of a kind, and he learns many lessons from the experiences that Sachi has gone through. At a time before Stephen, Sachi was a young, beautiful woman that was admired by everyone in the village. This was all until the leprosy outbreak in Japan. Many people all across Japan, and many parts of Tarumi were affected. Out of the many people being infected, Sachi, unfortunately, was one of the many people who caught the disease. When this happens, Sachi is faced with obstacles that she can’t overcome through her limited understanding, at the time, of these obstacles.

In the story, time after time Sachi has demonstrated power over her fears and obstacles through experiences in life, that brought her to realization. Throughout Gail Tsukiyama's, Samurai’s Garden, the author uses Sachi’s thoughts and feelings about the Japanese idealism of honor and her experiences with leprosy, to show that the path of overcoming adversity...

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